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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, congress directed the federal agencies including the faa and nasa collaborating in accelerating the integration of uas into the national air space. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 contains provisions designed to promote and facilitate the use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we, on the subcommittee, know that you've been working hard and have made progress towards meeting the prescribed objectives, but we also know that there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatorily. again, i go to the goal today to have the research to overcome technology issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national air space system. we're particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating as a as a vulnerabilities. the agreements on technological standards and the "washington post" reported nine american uas crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot ere -- error. there's poor coordination with air traffic controllers. in august 2010, the "new york times" reported that a navy uas violated air space
and a meteorite. thank you. will? >>> a great deal of questions and mystery surrounding this. nasa ambassador greg red fern also the sky guy is here. always good to see you. >> you too will. >> whether or not this thing actually hit the ground? do we know that yet? >> i think that there was an impact because before we went on air i was surfing the net and they show a picture of a 26- foot wide crater in the ice. and in studying the video that we saw today. it looks like after the terminal burst which was a big flash that everybody saw was brighter than the sun. there were other meteorites that fell to ground that an expedition will go out and map the field where all this things landed and give us a good picture of what happened that day. >> the folks that actually do this. you call them hunters right? >> yes i can guarantee you there are people who have got their passports and they're on their way to there right now to join the people there. >> not just because they're interested. there's value here right? >> absolutely. i tell you with an event like this, you're talking tens of thousands of dolla
a lot of our satellites. steve has more. >> imagine nasa spent over a year tracking that asteroid waiting to for it to get its closer point today to be outshined by the met your. the images coming out of russia are almost unbelievable. imagine seeing this bright flash on your drive to work this morning. the shock waves shattering glass, damaging buildings and injuring hundreds of people it exploded over central russia. an 11-year-old described ates pretty cool. inside nasa described it this way. >> it formed four and half billion years ago but it spent most of its life outside the asteroid belt. >> the blast in russia almost overshadowed the earth's close call with the asteroid, a 150-foot chunk of rack, big enough to create a crater similar to these craters caused by asteroids striking the moon. >> the good news is we've been tracking this for over a year, we know everybody is safe and it did not hit the earth. >> while nasa tracked the asteroid at 17,000 miles above the earl the asteroid over russia was just six miles over the earth. this
into space. the land sat data continuity mission will blast off from california. nasa calls it the most advanced and capable spacecraft of its kind ever built helping to monitor environmental change and natural resources. it's about the size of an suv and will likely be in orbit for many years. once it's in space, the u.s. geological survey will take over operations. >>> take a look at these photos. nasa says a solar flare happened over the weekend. it sent particles in the earth's direction. that likely isn't enough to pose a threat. they call the eruption minor but long in duration. nasa says the biggest effect here will likely be auroras near the north and south pole. >> the auroras are beautiful to see. we benefit in that way for sure. >> for sure. >>>let check had with tom kierein for a look at all the rain coming down. tom? >> yes, we've had a tenth to quarter of an inch of rain late last night. raining lightly in washington right now. we can see the jefferson memorial from the hd city camera. we've had a lot of the rain tapering off across northern virginia, the district into mar
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the northern hemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to t
to be amateur astronomers right now. those people have the most eyes on the sky. even nasa is looking at the skies but in terms of shear numbers, there are lots of people out in their backyards with telescopes looking up at the sky and this -- asteroid that missed us was discovered by amateurs. >> i knew save the world. dave mosier good to see you this morning. thanks for insight. appreciate it unbelievable video high speed police chase horrific ending. car crashing right into the cruiser. whole thing caught on camera. this happens way too much. and then for the first time in almost 600 years the pope has resigned. if you have got a lifelong career, like the pontiff, when is the right time to call it quits? fbn nicole petallides is here to talk about retirement coming up. hey nicole. she will be in here in a second. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we don't let frequent heartburn
of the nasa student ambassador program. his family says green had a mental illness. >> family let our detectives know that this suspect had this condition for at least a year. and that in the past, he had been prescribed medication for this mental illness. >> reporter: it happened around 1:00 this morning at a rental house close by the college park campus. police say that green set fires in and around the house and in an apparent effort to draw his room mates outside. when the two room mates came out, they say green opened fire. he killed one, wounded another, then turned the gun on himself. >> around 1:00 a.m. we heard about ten shots fired. and we couldn't figure out if it was gunshots or firecrackers. >> reporter: the police say the gun green used, he purchased legally. apparently after he was diagnosed with mental illness. in addition to the murder weapon, police say, green also had a bag containing a baseball bat. a machete. a loaded semiautomatic weapon and some extra ammunition. there's no evidence that green's mental problems ever came to the attention of university officials.
nasa goddard, a graduate of morgan state university in baltimore. >> when i met him, he was a nice guy, you know, very well- spoken and a january win, nice guy. >> reporter: family told investigators green was suffering from a mental illness for a year and was predescribed medication to treat it. >> and my thoughts are this is a great tragedy for the university of maryland entire community, and our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and loved ones. >> reporter: police say they have recovered the apparent murder weapon, a legally per chased .9-millimeter handgun. a bag with a machete, fully loaded semi automatic weapon was found near green. chip cobb said he hid inside his home next door after calling 9 heaven . >> mostly, am -- 911. >> mostly i responded to the first responders and they were here almost immediately. >> reporter: the other suv had the rear window blown out. a first-floor window also struck by a bullet. >> the kitchen window had a shot to it and if she was standing there, she would be gone. >> reporter: the university officials say they will be holding a memorial
daryl hannah, and nasa climate scientist james hansen and former chair of the naacp julian bond. the protest was a landmark for the sierra club environmental group after its board endorsed an act of civil disobedience for the first time in its 120-year history. director michael brune was among those arrested. >> so we know we cannot win on climate change if we continue to talk about it but not do anything. so the sierra club is engaging in civil disobedience for the first time because with a moral catastrophe on our hands and need to do what we can to compel stronger, bolder action. >> we will be joined by michael brune and actress daryl hannah after the headlines. president obama as pick for treasury secretary faced questions over his wall street past at a senate confirmation hearing wednesday. jack lew defended the bonus of nearly $1 million he received while working at citigroup just a few months after the bank added taxpayer bailout worth billions. he was also a question of his investment of tens of thousands of dollars in a citigroup fund listed at a building in the cayman
scientists can see cosmic rocks coming our way, doing something about it is the tricky part. in theory, nasa would be able to knock a threatening incoming asteroid off orbit so it misses earth. but there's very little precedent for that. the only thing that comes close was a 2005 mission where nasa steered a probe about the size of a coffee table into an oncoming docket, a project known as -- comet, a prooj knoject kn "deep comet." >> with the they're tess should work fine, certainly there would be details in launching a massive object into space, making sure we guide it correctly so it will hit the right spot on the asteroid to knock it appropriately off-course. >> reporter: scientists say these events, the meteor in russia and the asteroid's close call, should be a wake-up call. if the asteroid instead of missing earth had impacted, say, washington, d.c., it would have been devastating. >> if it's dense enough and could hit the earth intact, the impact crater itself would not be that big. but the effects from the shockwave and the heat from impact would be enough to basically wipe out ever
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
. >> and if that's not enough, today 130,000-ton astroid had a close encounter with the earth. here's how the n.a.s.a. folks explained what could happen. >> astroid 2012da14 is an object about half the size. a football field in diameter that is going to pass very close to the earth on february 15th. coming from the south to the north it gets to within 17,200 miles of the earth's surface and will pass the interior to the gps satellites, but there's no chance of the as street hitting the earth and very little chance it will hit a satellite. >> they were right. they say this was the closest fly-by ever of a space rock of this size. and it was traveling at more than 17,000 miles an hour. that's it for us tonight. thank for watching. i'm juan williams in for bill o'reilly. please remember, the spin comes here because we are looking out for you.
died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west when the storms come this summer and they are coming, the firefighters you call on them and beg them to come in and fight. and the weather service, those of you from florida and the tornado area and hurricanes area, the weathermen stay around the clockworking, frozen for three years. border patrol, brian terry, the people that work with him that are on the border where gangs, violent gangs coming across the border, brosen. for three -- frozen for three years. d.e.a. and others. the doctors out at walter reed, if you go out and visit walter reed or go visit your v.a. hospital, the doctors and the nurses that are working with the wounded warriors, people who have lost their limbs in afghanistan and iraq, frozen for three years. wi
as a test pilot for another three decades. occasionally flying for the air force and nasa ras a consultant. in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the his historic flight breaking the sound barrier, he flew past mach i again. it was his last official flight with the air force. but of course nothing stops chuck yeager. so last october on the 65th anniversary of breaking the sound barrier, he did it again in another aircraft at the age of 89. whenever he's asked about all of his exploits, chuck says he was just doing his job, and that all he is he owes to the air force. he's never, ever wavered from that. in his awl auto biography he wrote, "my beginnings back in west virginia tell who i am to this day. my accomplishments aes a pilot tell more about luck, happe happenstance and a persones destiny. but the guy who broke the sound barrier was the kid to swam the mud river with a swiped watermelon or shot the head off a squirrel before school." tom wolfe believed chuck yeager to be the most rightous of all possessors of the right stuff. the right stuff wolfe himself struggled to explain what he mea
her last words. her nasa good-bye. >> i take with me so many amazing memories and things that are in here, that are in here. i will treasurer forever. i'm going to miss you all so much. i love you very, very much. >> oh, dear. imagine you have family and her friends and you watch this, and it's going to be on air for the next nine weeks. some people argue here this reality show continuing to air this footage of reeva is in poor taste. others say it's just a fitting tribute. back to you. >> and her family supported it as well. thank you. appreciate it. the update on that tremendously complicated case. >>> a two-alarm fire at a recycling company in tampa, florida. they believe a pile of scrap metal caught on fire, but they don't know how. they plan to use foam to put out the flames and later they will use a bulldozer to try to move the scrap metal. >>> we have learned an aerospace executive has been fired after he allegedly slapped a crying toddler on a delta flight from minneapolis to atlanta. the company who employed 60-year-old joe hundley called his behavior offensive a
system. nasa's space exploration program, and work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today are going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago be released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study bus methodology is conclusions are grim. it's as sequestration if going forward will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast -- be oak reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are read-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not for ward about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
are affected as well. for example, faa's operation of the national aerospace system, nasa's space exploration program, and no was work on necessary new satellite, weather satellite program. these are sequestration's negative impacts and they raise will be on national security. the diverse group of leaders with us today are going to be a testing to this. we are going passionate about six month ago we released a study conducted by doctor stephen forte of george mason university. the study's methodology has found and in its conclusions are grim. the study says that sequestration if it goes forward will put 2.1 million jobs at risk. these are defense and nondefense related jobs, and they include nearly 1 million small businesses. what caused the unemployment rate to rise by 1.5% and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion, 215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast, cbo, reinforces his conclusions that sequestration will significant undermine u.s. sustained growth. so, today, we are really releasing doctor for study and his analysis of these potential economic impacts of sequ
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
started to massage and perhaps is the best way that the nasa administrator scot to run the space program without the omb folks saying you do this, you do that pursuant to directives given in the act which senator rockefeller chairs the commerce committee. and i want to thank you for that because what you did, use move the debt out so that the senator kay bailey hutchison and i could bring unanimity and we got a better option for the space program three years ago that other wise was in turmoil and that is in her no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that what you did and how much the center appreciates it. i want to ask you a -- we have all of this international finance stirring and a lot of it is going to run under. to give me your thoughts on that. >> senator, the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch very closely. as much as we try to do our own business we can't separate ourselves from the world entirely. we can make sure that our financial institutions are sound and that we run our policy is appropriately. europe is our largest export
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)